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Indianapolis road rage on I 465

Yesterday, here in Indianapolis, a woman on I 465 was actually shot in the abdomen as the result of an apparent road rage incident. The details are not exactly known, but the shooter fired several shots into the injured woman’s SUV.

Now I have felt some anger and frustration on the road at times, but this is hard to believe. What are the statistics of road rage in the US?

MonkeyMeter.com lists Indianapolis at 2.55 on a 1 to 5 scale, which gives us a moderate level rating for road rage. AAA did a study back in 1997 and found that 37% of drives experiencing road rage used a firearm, 28% used another weapon, and 35% used their car…I wonder what it is now? I have heard of a guy, here in Indianapolis, taking marbles and throwing them out his window after he has passed a crabby driver.

The interesting thing is that there is a difference between road rage and aggressive driving according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration:

Aggressive Driving - “The commission of two or more moving violations that is likely to endanger other persons or property, or any single intentional violation that requires a defensive reaction of another driver.

Road Rage – “An assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger(s) of one motor vehicle on the operator or passenger(s) of another motor vehicle caused by an incident that occurred on a roadway.

How can you know if you suffer from road rage or if you are an aggressive driver? From the Washington State Patrol, here are some symptoms:

Mentally condemning or thought of violence toward other drivers.
Verbally expressing condemnation of other drivers to passengers in your vehicle.
Not obeying traffic safety rules, because you don’t agree with them.

Also, do you engage in the following aggressive and risky driving behaviors:

Following too close.
Speeding.
Weaving in and out of traffic.
Speeding up to beat a traffic light.
Cutting between vehicles to change lanes.
Using the horn excessively.
Flashing headlights excessively at oncoming traffic.
Braking to get others to back off your bumper.
Passing traffic and then slowing to teach the other driver a lesson.

If you think you do some of the above, you may want to seek help, give us an email by clicking the “contact” tab at the top right of this page, or call 317-713-1130. If you suffer because of those who do the above you may want to pull over and let them go by.

For some excellent information on road rage from every aspect, go to www.drdriving.org